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Poggio Anima 'Uriel' Grillo

Grillo

750 ML

$14.99

Product Description

Grillo, also known as Riddu, is a white wine grape variety which withstands high temperatures and is widely used in Sicilian wine-making and, in particular, for Marsala. Grillo is crisp and light in texture, with moderate acidity and notable sweetness. The vineyards are located in Western Sicily, in the Salemi area at about 40kms from Marsala. They are planted east facing following the vertical trellis system on sandy and clay rich soil, using guyot pruning. At an altitude of around 500 meters above sea level, they are about 15 years old. Uriel, the archangel of repentance. Uriel played a very important role in ancient texts as the rescuer of Jesus' cousin John the Baptist from the Massacre of the Innocents ordered by King Herod. The translation of Uriel is God of Light. Uriel was the angel who checked each of the doors during the Passover in order to ensure safety for Gods people. Grillo is a very resilient grape and one that withstands a lot of heat and wind on Sicily. It is probably best known as the foundation for Marsala but in its dry form has many interesting characteristics. It is the most important white grape on Sicily and therefore the principal light. Light straw yellow in color, it has a rich bouquet of tropical fruit with notes of apricots and peaches. It is full and round on the palate with a lovely balancing acidity and a long perfumed finish. Region: Sicily IGT Varietal: 100% Grillo Vintage: 2012 Vine Age: 16 years old Yield: 4.1 tons/acre Soil Type: Alluvial with Sand & Limestone Oak: None - Stainless Steel Production: 1,200 cases

Details

Varietal: Grillo

Region: Italy

Region Description:

Makes nearly as much wine as France, but lags behind in their classification system. As a result, Italian wine isn’t taken as seriously as French wine. Most Italian wine is made from native grape varieties that don’t grow well elsewhere, such as Nebbiolo and Sangiovese. The most important regions are Piedmont, where Barolo and Barbaresco dominate, Tuscany, home to Chianti, Montepulciano, and the Super-Tuscans (a collection of relatively new reds), and the Northeastern region, where you’ll find Soave, Valpolicella, and Bardolino. Italy’s soils and climates are varied and ideally suited for viticulture, from the Alpine foothills in the north to the Mediterranean coast in the South. Its hilly landscape provides sun and cooler temperatures, even in the warmest regions. Italy has two categories of fine wines. DOCG, which means regulated and guaranteed place name, refers to a small group of elite wines. DOB wines are those with regulated (but not guaranteed) place names. A lower tier of table wines are grouped into IGT wines, which indicate the location on the label, and ordinary table wines, which carry no geographical indication except, “Italy.”