Cordials and Liqueurs

Matteos Lemon Soprano

Limoncello

375 ML

$16.99

Product Description

Matteo's relatives in Italy have enjoyed a homemade lemon cream for generations. They choose the most beautiful lemons from trees growing in their gardens, to produce this unique alcoholic beverage. Traditionally served to family and friends at the end of their legendary hours-long outdoor meals, after caffé, as a "digestivo," it is truly made with passion and love, like the meal itself. Matteo brings this taste to America for his friends to enjoy, along with delicious cocktail and dessert recipes. Here in the States, Lemon Soprano can be served solo, in a Marco Polo smoothie, in iced tea or mixed cocktails, or simply drizzled over a bowl of fresh strawberries. A creamy lemon drop is fantastico! Indulge your passion with the taste of our Italian family recipe.

Details

Varietal: Limoncello

Region: Italy

Region Description:

Makes nearly as much wine as France, but lags behind in their classification system. As a result, Italian wine isn’t taken as seriously as French wine. Most Italian wine is made from native grape varieties that don’t grow well elsewhere, such as Nebbiolo and Sangiovese. The most important regions are Piedmont, where Barolo and Barbaresco dominate, Tuscany, home to Chianti, Montepulciano, and the Super-Tuscans (a collection of relatively new reds), and the Northeastern region, where you’ll find Soave, Valpolicella, and Bardolino. Italy’s soils and climates are varied and ideally suited for viticulture, from the Alpine foothills in the north to the Mediterranean coast in the South. Its hilly landscape provides sun and cooler temperatures, even in the warmest regions. Italy has two categories of fine wines. DOCG, which means regulated and guaranteed place name, refers to a small group of elite wines. DOB wines are those with regulated (but not guaranteed) place names. A lower tier of table wines are grouped into IGT wines, which indicate the location on the label, and ordinary table wines, which carry no geographical indication except, “Italy.”