Cognac and Brandy

Korbel 'Rich & Mellow' Brandy

Cognac/Brandy

750 ML

$11.99

Product Description

Made from 100% California grapes, rich, natural, clean-tasting Korbel Classic Brandy is the all American brandy. Its long, smooth finish lets you savor the brandy, along with the good things in life. Bottled at 80 proof, Korbel Classic is the original brandy that Francis Korbel handcrafted in 1889. Its the very brandy that helped launch an American success story of a man who persevered through imprisonment, earthquakes and fire to achieve his American dream. Korbel invites you to share the dream… because Francis Korbels dreams, your dreams, and Classic brandy are the stuff that heroes are made from. TASTING At our Central Valley winery, we crush and ferment only the finest California brandy grapes to make our base wines. The young wines are then distilled in a copper lined still to ensure the highest level of purity and flavor. The fiery heat of the water-white new distillates is slowly mellowed in one of our 30,000 small, American oak barrels. These barrels are specially charred during their construction to leave a layer of natural charcoal in contact with the brandy. This slow barrel aging, in contact with both the oak and the natural charcoal, gives the brandy its golden color and smooth, elegant flavor.

Details

Varietal: Cognac/Brandy

Region: United States

Region Description:

Wineries exist in all fifty states, but the most predominant (and best) wine comes from Northern California, Oregon, and Washington State, with New York gaining a foothold in the industry. American wines make up about 75% of all wine sales in the US. The appellation system uses the term AVA (American Viticultural Area) to determine where wines were produced, but grape varieties can be planted anywhere in the country. American wineries generally use varietal labeling, and government regulations require that the variety on the label must make up at least 75% of the blend (in Oregon it’s 90%). The words reserve, special selection, private reserve, classic, and so on have no legal definition in the US. Some wineries use these terms to indicate their better wines; others use the words as a marketing tool to move lower quality wines off the shelf.