Doppelbock

Ayinger Celebrator Doppelbock

Doppelbock

11.2 oz

1 bottle

$3.09

Product Description

A beer that has a dominant malty taste. This beers origins This Beer's Origins in a monks recipe are reflected in its heartiness. in a monk's recipe are reflected in its heartiness. The Pope The Pope of Beers, Conrad Seidl, describes it as: Almost black with of Beers, Conrad Seidl, describes it as: "Almost black with a very slight red tone, a sensational, festive foam and truly extraordinary fragrance that at first summons up visions of greaves lard. a very slight red tone, a sensational, festive foam and truly extraordinary fragrance that at first summons up visions of greaves lard. The first taste is of mild fullness with an accompanying coffee tone, which becomes more dominant The first taste is of mild fullness with an accompanying coffee tone, which becomes more dominant with the aftertaste. with the aftertaste. There is very little of the sweetness that is frequently to be tasted with doppelbock beer. The Ayinger Celebrator has been ranked among the best beers of the world by the Chicago Testing Institute several times and has won numerous platinum medallions. . There is very little of the sweetness that is frequently to be tasted doppelbock with beer. "The Ayinger Celebrator has been ranked among the best beers of the world by the Chicago Testing Institute several times and has won numerous platinum medallions..

Details

Varietal: Doppelbock

Region: Germany

Region Description:

The northernmost wine-producing country in Europe, Germany’s cool climates are mostly suitable for white grapes. The best vineyards are situated along rivers such as the Rhine and the Mosel, which temper the extremes of weather and help the grapes ripen. German wines are named after the places they come from, usually a combination of a village name, a vineyard name, and a grape name. German law makes no distinctions of quality between vineyards. As a result, many wines are mass-produced. Look for the classification QbA or QmP to assure that the grower is reputable. The finest wines are given a Prädikat, which is an indication of the ripeness of the grapes at harvest. There are six levels of Prädikat; in order from the least ripe to the ripest they are Kabinett, Spätlese, Auslese, Beerenauslese (BA) Eiswein, and Trockenbeerenauslese (TBA). At the three highest levels, the amount of sugar in the grapes is so high that the wines are inevitably sweet, but since Prädikat is an indication of the amount of sugar in the grape at harvest (and not in the wine) the lower levels of Prädikat offer no direct hint about the wine’s sweetness.