Aecht 'Schlenkerla' Rauchbier Weizen

Imports & Microbrews

500 ML

1 bottle


Product Description

"Smokebeer from Schlenkerla is a dark, aromatic, bottom fermented beer with 13.5 percent original extract, which is equivalent to an alcohol content of 5.1 percent. No doubt: there are stronger beers, but nevertheless, one should not underestimate ... it can make you "schlenker" quite a bit. Its smoky flavor is being achieved by exposing the malt to the intense, aromatic smoke of burning beech-wood logs at the Schlenkerla-maltings. After mixing it with premium-class hops in the brew, it matures in 700 year old cellars, deep down in the hills of Bamberg, into a mellow, magnificent-tasting beer, best drunk directly in "Schlenkerla". An Original amongst the beers, even amongst the Bavarian beers. You can drink it in the "Alte Lokal" at white-scrubbed wooden tables - covering them with a tablecloth would be a sin - underneath an old timbered ceiling, even darker than the beer. You can drink it in the "Klause", a former monastery, built in 1310, or you can drink it in the inner court next to a 500-liter wooden-keg. All this is the Schlenkerla."


Varietal: Imports & Microbrews

Region: Germany

Region Description:

The northernmost wine-producing country in Europe, Germany’s cool climates are mostly suitable for white grapes. The best vineyards are situated along rivers such as the Rhine and the Mosel, which temper the extremes of weather and help the grapes ripen. German wines are named after the places they come from, usually a combination of a village name, a vineyard name, and a grape name. German law makes no distinctions of quality between vineyards. As a result, many wines are mass-produced. Look for the classification QbA or QmP to assure that the grower is reputable. The finest wines are given a Prädikat, which is an indication of the ripeness of the grapes at harvest. There are six levels of Prädikat; in order from the least ripe to the ripest they are Kabinett, Spätlese, Auslese, Beerenauslese (BA) Eiswein, and Trockenbeerenauslese (TBA). At the three highest levels, the amount of sugar in the grapes is so high that the wines are inevitably sweet, but since Prädikat is an indication of the amount of sugar in the grape at harvest (and not in the wine) the lower levels of Prädikat offer no direct hint about the wine’s sweetness.