Domaine Paul Autard Châteauneuf-du-Pape - $69.99

Wine Details

Vintage: 1998
Price: $69.99
Producer: Paul Autard
Region: Châteauneuf-du-Pape
Varietal: Rhone Blend - Red
Container Size: 750 ML
Flavors:
  • Red Wine
Add to Tasting Journal

Product Description

  • Paul Autard’s Chateauneuf du Pape is a forward, heady effort revealing notes of Asian spices, new saddle leather, peppery, sweet black cherry fruit, and wood smoke. Medium to full-bodied, lush, and surprisingly opulent for this structured vintage, it will drink well for 7-8 years.
  • Jean-Paul Autard has managed the family domaine since the age of seventeen. When it comes to cultivation, vinification, and related factors (ripeness as measured in phenols, total égrappage at the time of harvest, aging in barrels), he aims for balance among all the crucial elements: not just materials but timing, as well.

Expert Ratings

Ratings   Vintage Source Flavors
Tanzer - 90 Details: ($42) Deep ruby. Dark berry liqueur and kirsch aromas are complemented by smoky garrigue and licorice, giving the wine a rather brooding personality. Big and fleshy, with deep dark fruit preserve flavors, youthfully chunky tannins and a broad, long finish. There's more than enough fruit here to outlast the tannins. 2005 Tanzer berry, cherry, kirsch, meat, violet
WineSpectator - 91 Details: There's nice drive to the cassis, blackberry and graphite flavors, with solid underlying notes of [i]garrigue[n] and tobacco. The structure is solid, but this is well-rounded for drinking now. Drink now through 2015. 1,200 cases imported. –JM 2005 WineSpectator spices
WineSpectator - 90 Details: A good beam of black currant and raspberry, with tobacco, tar and graphite notes on the racy finish. Slightly firm and toasty now, but has solid concentration. Should open up nicely in the near term. Best from 2007 through 2016. 2,915 cases made. –JM 2004 WineSpectator black currant, graphite, raspberry, tar, tobacco
Tanzer - 90 Details: ($40) Deep red. Intense raspberry and candied cherry on the nose. Smoky dark plum and kirsch flavors are impressively focused and concentrated, with a suggestion of game arriving on the back. The lingering finish features supple tannins and flavors of ripe dark berries and garrigue 2004 Tanzer berry, cassis, espresso, fresh herbs, leather, licorice, meat, plum
Tanzer - 90 Details: ($42) Deep ruby. Dark berry liqueur and kirsch aromas are complemented by smoky garrigue and licorice, giving the wine a rather brooding personality. Big and fleshy, with deep dark fruit preserve flavors, youthfully chunky tannins and a broad, long finish. There's more than enough fruit here to outlast the tannins. 2005 Tanzer berry, cherry, kirsch, meat, violet
WineSpectator - 92 Details: Nearly candied up front, with a hard shell around the black cherry and boysenberry fruit flavors, but sweet mocha, spice and mineral notes emerge in the end, where fine-grained tannins carry the finish. A beauty that should develop nicely. Best from 2008 through 2020. 4,000 cases made. –JM 2003 WineSpectator black cherry, boysenberry, candied, mineral, mocha, spice
Tanzer - 90 Details: ($38) Dark red. Rich, powerful scents of dark cherry, roasted plum, cured meat and black tea. Firm, well-focused flavors of bitter cherry, licorice and grilled meat are nicely defined and bright. Long, fresh and lively on the finish, with dusty, fine tannins. 2003 Tanzer bitter, cherry, licorice, meat, plum, tea
WineSpectator - 90 Details: Traditional, but very ripe, this is a full-bodied, rich, sweet-tasting Châteauneuf that offers a lot of wine for the buck. Not so elegant, perhaps, but, like a Port, it oozes with flavors--vanilla, plum, licorice, citrus, roasted nuts, leather, chocolate cake. Best from 2006 through 2015. 3,500 cases made. –PM 2001 WineSpectator chocolate, citrus, leather, licorice, nuts, plum, vanilla
Tanzer - 90 Details: ($34) Deep red. Perfumed aromas of red fruits and gingerbread, with an exotic hint of apricot. Fat, lush, creamy and sweet; not especially complex but stuffed with liqueur-like fruit. A dense, chewy, tactile Chateauneuf with no shortage of verve. Finishes with sweet tannins and excellent length. 2001 Tanzer candied, red fruits
Tanzer - 90 Details: ($34) Deep red. Perfumed aromas of red fruits and gingerbread, with an exotic hint of apricot. Fat, lush, creamy and sweet; not especially complex but stuffed with liqueur-like fruit. A dense, chewy, tactile Chateauneuf with no shortage of verve. Finishes with sweet tannins and excellent length. 90 points 2001 Tanzer apricot, red fruits
1 2 3

Food Pairings

Category Pairing
Cheese Mozzarella, Sharp Cheddar, Feta, Parmesan, Brie, Soft Pungent Cheese
Red Meat Goulash, Grilled Beef, Hamburgers, Beef Stew, Barbeque Pulled-Pork or Ribs, Pork Chops, Lamb, Lamb Shish Kabobs, Goulash, Game, Rabbit, Farmed Venison, Wild Game - Elk, Caribou, Moose, Venison, Grilled Sausage, Casseroles / Hot Dish
Poultry & Eggs Coq Au Vin, Roast Chicken with Herbs, Roast Turkey, Duck Confit, Glazed Duck, Game Birds, Pheasant
Vegetables Lentils, Mushrooms, Olives, Black, Ratatouille
Fish or Shellfish Tuna, Mahi-Mahi
Sauces Tomato Sauce, Red Wine Sauce
Herbs & Spices Bay Leaf, Juniper, Lavender, Mint, Rosemary, Thyme

Wine Terms

Name Value
Châteauneuf-du-Pape (shah toe nuf doo pahp)—Situated on the sun-baked southern reaches of the Rhone Valley, this appellation grows a great number of grape varieties, but is best known for its full-bodied dry reds. As many as thirteen different kinds of grape can end up in one bottle, although most vintners use only three or four, especially Syrah, Mourvédre, and Grenache.
France France is the standard bearer for all the world’s wines, with regard to the types of grapes that are used to make wine and with the system of defining and regulating winemaking. Its Appellation d’Origine Controlee, or AOC system, is the legislative model for most other European countries. Most French wines are named after places. The system is hierarchical; generally the smaller and more specific the region for which a wine is named, the higher its rank. There are four possible ranks of French wine, and each is always stated on the label: Appellation Contrôlée (or AOC), Vin Délimité de Qualité Supérieure (or VDQS); Vin de pays, or country wine; and Vin de table. France has five major wine regions, although there are several others that make interesting wines. The three major regions for red wine are Bordeaux, Burgundy, and the Rhone; for white wines, the regions are Burgundy, the Loire and Alsace. Each region specialized in certain grape varieties for its wines, based on climate, soil, and local tradition. Two other significant French wine regions are Provence and Languedoc-Roussillon, both in the south of France. Cahors, in the southwest of the country, produces increasingly good wines.
Rhône Valley Located in southeastern France, between the city of Lyon and the region of Provence, this area’s sunny and hot growing season is reflected in its full-bodied wines. In the southern Rhone, the Grenache grape makes wines that are high in alcohol and low in tannin. The most famous wine from the southern Rhone is Châteauneuf-du-Pape. This blended red wine can contain as many as thirteen grape varieties, but most often includes Grenache, Mourvèdre, and Syrah. It is full-bodied, rich and ripe. In the northern Rhone, most wines are made from the Syrah grape and are rich and full-bodied. Two of the best are Côte Rôtie, which is soft, fruity, and can carry the flavors of green olives and raspberries, and Red Hermitage, which is a complex, tannic wine that should develop for several years, and can be aged for thirty years or more.

Tasting Notes

Please login to view your personal tasting notes.Login